Home | Contact | Advertising
Small Business, Information, Resources, Articles - SmartBiz.com
Members Login:
Sign Up Forgot?
SALES & MARKETING
Marketing Online
Email Marketing
Search Marketing
Selling
PR
ONLINE BUSINESS
E-Commerce
Website Creation
Productivity
Accounting
CRM
Web-based Software/SaaS
BUSINESS STRATEGIES
Case Studies
Smart Answers
Videos
Podcasts
Smart Blog
Human Resources
Management
BITS & BYTES
PCs & Online Equipment
Mobile Computing
Security/Business Continuity
Telecom/Office Networks
Small Business Products
FORUMS & RESOURCES
Free White Papers
Tools and Calculators
SmartBiz Forum
Legal & Business Forms
News Feeds
Featured Webcasts & Videos
Franchise Offers


 
SMALL BUSINESS AND STARTUPS INTERNET TECHNOLOGY RESOURCES
Search SmartBiz:
Forms and
Downloads
Free
White Papers
Special
Offers
SmartBiz
Blog
Free Email
Newsletters
Telecom/Office Networks
How to plan for new technology
Email ArticleEmail Article
Print ArticlePrint Article
Increase Text SizeIncrease Text Size
Decrease Text SizeDecrease Text Size
Del.icio.us
Digg This
Bookmark and Share

By Jan Greene

If your hospital is typical, its leaders have heard the terms "proteomics" and "nanotechnology," but are still spending more time worrying about Medicare reimbursement rates than about how the organization will cope with the accelerating pace of change in medical and information technology. But considering that high-tech firms are rapidly developing devices and procedures that will radically change the way health care is delivered, and that newly empowered consumers will be demanding those innovations, hospitals that aren't planning now for changes on the five-, 10- and 15-year horizon are destined to become dinosaurs.

"This technology is going to happen whether they [hospitals] plan for it or not," predicts John Haughom, M.D., senior vice president for health care improvement at PeaceHealth, based in Washington state. "Five years from now, hospitals won't survive without being able to manage through these decisions."

Bottom line, it's a long-term, strategic issue that falls right into the laps of hospital trustees charged with the future viability of their organizations.

"I think this is one area where hospitals could do a much better job educating their trustees," says health care futurist Jeff Goldsmith. "It's a topic that management has discomfort with. And there's a kind of entropy that drags people back into day-- to-day operating details."

Instead, say those with a clear view into the technology crystal ball, trustees need to become knowledgeable about medical and information technology and push administrators to develop a coherent long-term plan.

"Many organizations are just coming to grips with the fact that they have to have a more organized approach to technology planning," says Molly Joel Coye, M.D., executive director of the Health Technology Center in San Francisco.

Traditionally, new technology enters a hospital in a scattershot way-a physician with clout buys into a vendor's pitch and demands that the hospital purchase the latest doohickey. Many hospitals consider long-term technology planning to be equivalent to asking someone on staff to log on to the Internet for a few hours. But that kind of approach won't fly in the brave new world of high-tech medicine.

Instead, those familiar with the dizzying prospect of such innovations as robotic surgery and genetic testing coming on line in the next five years, urge hospital trustees to get involved with this issue before it's too late.


| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | Next page »
Add a Comment View Comments
Small Business Home

SmartBiz Shop
Promotional Items with Your logo
 
     
 
Smart Services
Spacer
Spacer
Spacer
Spacer
Add Your Logo Now
Spacer
Get Your Business Online
Build a Website Host Your Website Market Your Business Online
Business Form Downloads
Legal Forms Business Forms
Smart Forums
Recent Postings
Stimulus or "Pork"ulus?
Blog: How Do You Know What Insurance Is Right for Your Business?
If Layoffs Are Necessary, Protect Your Business
Blog - Do You Have Email and Internet Usage Policies in Place?
MORE
Home | Contact | Advertising
© 2016-2018 SmartBiz. All rights reserved. Privacy Statement and Terms of Service
Small Business Home | Business Tools | Online Business | Bits & Bytes | Sales & Marketing | Business Strategies | Forums & Resources
Email Marketing & HTML Email Driven By: Hosted By:   Design By:
Email Marketing
 
XML LogoRSS Logo
Receive our stories via SmartBiz XML/RSS feeds.
Include our stories on your website through SmartBiz javascript content feeds.